How To Relocate To Germany: IT Specialists Sharing Their Experience (Part 2)

Would you like to read new interviews about relocation to Germany? As you remembered, in September we released the first article with three relocation stories from our successful candidates and now decided to make such interviews a tradition. Below are another three conversations with IT professionals about the main pitfalls of the relocation process, advantages of living in Germany and specificities of the adaptation process. Enjoy the reading!

Be prepared for the fact that it is difficult to find accommodation for a reasonable price in Germany

it-specialist-ruslan-relocationRuslan Barinov, Software Developer

From Russia to Munich

Why did you decide to find a job abroad and relocate to Europe? When and why you got that idea?

I used to ride my bike every day in Russia, and at some point started dreaming about riding through beautiful parks and neat streets instead of poor roads through the cemetery. That’s how it all started.

The second important factor was the broader opportunities to travel. We often talked with my future wife about how easy and accessible it would be to go on spontaneous trips if we lived in Europe.

The last straw came when I was once again told at my previous job that there were no options for me to take a vacation until summer. All of these pushed me to pack my bags and go for a job in Europe.

What was the most difficult for you in adapting to life in a new country? Why?

I think, to decide on relocation was more difficult than the relocation itself. Of course, once arrived in Germany, we had to deal with lots of bureaucratic issues and learn to tolerate the Germans’ love for excessive paperwork. There were also some smaller problems, like transportation issues and the inability to find citric acid in local shops.

As for advantages, there are amazing parks in Germany, the streets are clean, there is no need to use a taxi, and people are more reasonable.

What are the main pieces of advice you’d give yourself back in then when you were preparing for relocation?

Before moving, make clear what documents and processes need to be completed. For example, you’d better make appointments (“termin” in German) for Blaue Karte, registration in the embassy in advance. It will save you time and prevent unexpected surprises.

Be prepared for the fact that it is difficult to find accommodation for a reasonable price in Germany. Someone is lucky as we are, and someone faces huge competition. This is the case in Munich, but the situation is the same everywhere.

Forget about Russian realities and prices. The standard of living is different. Remember about the need to visit a tax office, create a bank account and purchase SIM cards. Everything is not so easy, but we were helped a lot by the Russian people in Munich.

Do you miss your homeland? What things (if any), reminding you of your homeland, you took with you when leaving for a new country?:)

I don’t miss Russia at all so far. Of course, sometimes I think about going to Yeisk, make a barbecue, drink local beer… My wife also missed our hometown a little bit at first. But it’s in the past now😊


If you love learning new things, moving for a job is the best experience

it-specialists-relocation-to-germany Alexandre Landskron, Software Developer

From Brazil to Munster

Why did you decide to find a job abroad and relocate to Europe? When and why you got that idea?

Everything started many years ago. I decided to join a project that required more skills in programming and good English and started working on further progress in coding and my language level. I wanted to interact with people from different countries, work with them, and soon became engaged in an international remote project. Things started getting more interesting – I gained new experience, updated my CV on LinkedIn and translated it into English to make it more visible for international recruiters. Initially, I focused on Sweden and was also thinking about Germany as technologies are very well developed there. So, it worked! In a few weeks, I received an email from Zero to One Search. It was amazing, as there are not so many opportunities like that in Brazil. I opened the email, read it ten times or more… Then there were several interviews and I finally arrived in Munster in a few months.

What was the most difficult for you in adapting to life in a new country? Why?

For me and my wife, the relocation process was smooth. Yes, you should deal with lots of paperwork here: registration, residence permit and so on. A recruiter from Zero to One Search helped us a lot with all the necessary information. There were no serious problems. Also, it was good that we found our apartment when we even were in Brazil, so there were no problems with renting. Everything here is so different from Brazil but so nice! If you love learning new things, moving for a job is the best experience.

In Brazil, everyone told me that German people are more closed, not so kind, but it is not true. Communication is very comfortable, and I have a lot of friends here already.

What are the main pieces of advice you’d give yourself back in then when you were preparing for relocation?

Be prepared to make a lot of appointments and paperwork. In the first two weeks here, you will receive hundreds of papers via post and email, but you need to be prepared for that in advance – this is the way everything works here. The best tip is to be positive about the staff and stop worrying and being afraid of talking with people. Everyone knows English in Germany and is ready to help you. If you plan to stay here for more time, it’s better to take German classes – personal or online. For example, my wife has taken an integration course and started studying German, and she already has a lot of friends from her class. It’s a good experience. In the first two months, you acquire so much information – you feel like a child.

Do you miss your homeland? What things (if any), reminding you of your homeland, you took with you when leaving for a new country? 🙂

We regularly meet our family in Brazil. Of course, we miss them, but we still can daily talk by phone, Skype or other apps. Yes, you can’t hug your family members, but you always stay connected. If you want to make progress, you need to be ready to handle such things.

I have enough day-offs here and can take a flight to Brazil for a couple of weeks. Sometimes, you stay in your country but still do not have so many options to regularly see your family and friends, so it’s the thing that you can handle, but not the easiest one.


Listen to the advice you are given, but follow official sources of information, they will give you the most helpful tips

it-specialists-relocationDiego Mendonca, Software Developer

From Brazil to Munich

Why did you decide to find a job abroad and relocate to Europe? When and why you got that idea?

I’m from Brazil and it’s a quite dangerous country. I started to think about forming my own family and did not want to stay at such a dangerous place. It was the key reason for me to relocate to Europe. Another one is that I always wanted to meet the challenge of working abroad and develop professionally in another country. I moved in September 2019 and now I live in Munich.

What was the most difficult for you in adapting to life in a new country? Why?

The first thing is the language. When I moved, I was not a German speaker, and it was quite difficult. I took a course and now I am learning German. This has been the most challenging thing for me, and I am working really hard on it. One more peculiarity is that sometimes it is not so easy to find accommodation in Munich, as it is the fast-growing city and many people come here for jobs and search for places to stay.

There are two Germans in my team now, and they are really friendly despite widespread stereotypes about the German mentality. I also often meet with German people outside my workplace, and all of them are really nice.

What are the main pieces of advice you’d give yourself back in then when you were preparing for relocation?

Be patient. It’s a piece of advice not only for those who are preparing to relocate to Germany but for anyone who is going to move to another country. You will have to deal with a lot of bureaucratic processes and paperwork. It’s also better to get information about all these administrative issues from official sources, as each person has its own experience and it could be different from your situation. Listen to the advice you are given, but follow official sources of information, they will give you the most helpful tips.

Do you miss your homeland? What things (if any), reminding you of your homeland, you took with you when leaving for a new country?:)

I miss my family, of course. You start missing even little things like the brand of shampoo you used at home and so on. But you should be prepared for that, it’s inevitable when you relocate to another country for a job.


  • Have a story to share? Contact us and we will be happy to talk to you!:)
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